Top 10 waterfalls in the world – Waterfalls that are most tallest, biggest and most beautiful in the world. There are countless amazing waterfalls around the world. From India to Zimbabwe, this are most visited waterfalls in the world.

1. Victoria Falls in Zimbabve

Victoria Falls is a waterfall in southern Africa on the Zambezi River at the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe. It has been described by CNN as one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the world.
While it is neither the highest nor the widest waterfall in the world, Victoria Falls is classified as the largest, based on its combined width of 1,708 metres (5,604 ft) and height of 108 metres (354 ft), resulting in the world’s largest sheet of falling water.& water spray raises very high and can be spotted from many kilometers away.

2. Iguazu Falls in Argentina/Brazil

They are the largest waterfalls system in the world.The falls divide the river into the upper and lower Iguazu.The Iguazu River rises near the city of Curitiba. For most of its course, the river flows through Brazil, however, most of the falls are on the Argentine side. Below its confluence with the San Antonio River, the Iguazu River forms the boundary between Argentina and Brazil.
Not very high (285 ft/87 m), but very impressive: it has 275 cascades, that form a horseshoe and stretch for 8858ft (2700 m). Legend has it that a deity planned to marry a beautiful woman named Naipí, who fled with her mortal lover Tarobá in a canoe. In a rage, the deity sliced the river, creating the waterfalls and condemning the lovers to an eternal fall.[3] The first European to record the existence of the falls was the Spanish conquistador Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca in 1541.

3.Angel Falls in Venezuela

It is the world’s highest uninterrupted waterfall, with a height of 979 meters (3,212 ft) and a plunge of 807 meters (2,648 ft). The waterfall drops over the edge of the Aui yan tepui mountain in the Canaima National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site in the Gran Sabana region of Bolívar State. The height figure 979 metres (3,212 ft) mostly consists of the main plunge but also includes about 400 metres of sloped cascade and rapids below the drop and a 30-metre (98 ft) high plunge downstream of the talus rapids.

4.Kaieteur Falls in Guyana

Kaieteur Falls is the world’s highest single drop waterfall, located on the Potaro River in the Kaieteur National Park, in Essequibo, Guyana. Its location is in the Amazon forest. It is 226 metres (741 ft) high when measured from its plunge over a sandstone and conglomerate cliff to the first break. It then flows over a series of steep cascades that, when included in the measurements, bring the total height to 251 metres (822 ft). While many falls have greater height, few have the combination of height and water volume, and Kaieteur is among the most powerful waterfalls in the world with an average flow rate of 663 cubic metres per second.Kaieteur Falls is about four times higher than Niagara Falls, on the border between Canada and the United States, and about twice the height of Victoria Falls, on the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe in Africa. It is a single drop waterfall.

5.Niagara Falls in USA/Canada

Niagara Falls is probably the most famous in the world. It marks US and Canada border. Niagara is formed of two sections – the Horseshoe Falls on the Canadian side and the American Falls on the American side – that are separated by an island. The Horseshoe Falls are more impressive: water here drops 173 ft (53 m), while the American Falls drop only 70–100 ft (21–30 m).The features that became Niagara Falls were created by the Wisconsin glaciation about 10,000 years ago. The same forces also created the North American Great Lakes and the Niagara River

6. Gullfoss (Golden Falls) in Iceland

Gullfoss is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Iceland. The wide Hvítá rushes southward, and about a kilometre above the falls it turns sharply to the right and flows down into a wide curved three-step “staircase” and then abruptly plunges in two stages (11 metres or 36 feet, and 21 metres or 69 feet) into a crevice 32 metres (105 ft) deep. The crevice, about 20 metres (66 ft) wide and 2.5 kilometres (1.6 mi) in length, extends perpendicular to the flow of the river. The average amount of water running down the waterfall is 140 cubic metres (4,900 cu ft) per second in the summer and 80 cubic metres (2,800 cu ft) per second in the winter. The highest flood measured was 2,000 cubic metres (71,000 cu ft) per second.As one first approaches the falls, the edge is obscured from view, so that it appears that the river simply vanishes into the earth.

7. Plitvice Falls in Croatia

Is one of the oldest national parks in Southeast Europe and the largest national park in Croatia.
In 1979, Plitvice Lakes National Park was added to the UNESCO World Heritage register.
The national park was founded in 1949 and is situated in the mountainous karst area of central Croatia, at the border to Bosnia and Herzegovina.bosniya aur harjegovinaThe important north-south road connection, which passes through the national park area, connects the Croatian inland with the Adriatic coastal region.
The protected area extends over 296.85 square kilometres (73,350 acres). About 90% of this area is part of Lika-Senj County, while the remaining 10% is part of Karlovac County.Each year, more than 1 million visitors are recorded

8. Yosemite Falls in USA

Yosemite Falls is the highest waterfall in Yosemite National Park, dropping a total of 2,425 feet (739 m) from the top of the upper fall to the base of the lower fall. Located in the Sierra Nevada of California, it is a major attraction in the park, especially in late spring when the water flow is at its peak.
The Ahwahneechee people called the waterfall “Cholock” (“the fall”) and believed that the plunge pool at its base was inhabited by the spirits of several witches, called the Poloti. An Ahwaneechee folktale describes a woman going to fetch a pail of water from the pool, and drawing it out full of snakes. Later that night, after the woman had trespassed into their territory, the spirits caused the woman’s house to be sucked into the pool by a powerful wind, taking the woman and her newborn baby with it.

9. Sutherland Falls in New Zealand

Sutherland Falls is a waterfall near Milford Sound in New Zealand’s South Island. At 580 metres (1,904 feet) the falls were long believed to be the tallest waterfall in New Zealand. However, Browne Falls cascades 843 metres (2,766 feet) down a mountainside in Doubtful Sound, leading some to view that as the tallest.
Water falls in three cascades, the upper is 229 (248) m tall, middle – 248 (229) m, lower – 103 m tall. Vertical fall of 580 m is made over 480 m of horizontal distance, thus the mean grade of falls is approximately 56 degrees.
The base of Sutherland Falls is a 90 minutes (return) walk from Quintin Public Shelter on the Milford Track….

10. Nohkalikai Falls in India

Nohkalikai Falls is the tallest plunge waterfall in India.[1] Its height is 1115 feet (340 metres), making it as the highest waterfall in India. The waterfall is located near Cherrapunji, one of the wettest places on Earth. Nohkalikai Falls are fed by the rainwater collected on the summit of comparatively small plateau and decrease in power during the dry season in December – February. Below the falls there has formed a plunge pool with unusual green coloured water.